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“It’s Briggs v. Elliott, it’s Brown v. Board…”
— Don Gordon

HISTORY

Briggs v. Elliot

“Briggs” was the first desegregation case to reach the Supreme Court.

Brown Case--Briggs v. Elliott (Brown Foundation): Describes how this school transportation equality case in Summerton, South Carolina, the heart of Clarendon School District One and of Scott’s Branch High School, became one of the five desegregation cases settled in the landmark decision held in Brown versus the Board of Education.

A Study of Educational Inequalities in South Carolina (Harmon Foundation, 1936): This NAACP documentary highlights racial disparities in the education provided in South Carolina public schools.


 Copy of the original petition that led to  Briggs v. Elliott

Copy of the original petition that led to Briggs v. Elliott

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Thurgood Marshall and other NAACP Legal Defense Fund lawyers represented Harry and Eliza Briggs and 19 other courageous parents from Clarendon County.  In a bold and vigorous dissent opposing the prevailing doctrine of separate by equal, WAring declared that segregation “must go and must go now.  Segregation is per se inequality.”  The U.S. Supreme Court followed his analysis as a central part of its groundbreaking decision in Brown v. Board of Education (1954).

 Courtesy: Supreme Court National Archives and Record Administration of School Segregation Cases-Order of Argument.

Courtesy: Supreme Court National Archives and Record Administration of School Segregation Cases-Order of Argument.

 Signed petition for Briggs vs. Elliott.

Signed petition for Briggs vs. Elliott.


Thurgood Marshall and other NAACP Legal Defense Fund lawyers represented Harry and Eliza Briggs and 19 other courageous parents from Clarendon County.  In a bold and vigorous dissent opposing the prevailing doctrine of separate by equal, WAring declared that segregation “must go and must go now.  Segregation is per se inequality.”  The U.S. Supreme Court followed his analysis as a central part of its groundbreaking decision in Brown v. Board of Education (1954).

Image from the Supreme Court National Archives and Record Administration of School Segregation Cases-Order of Argument

Image of the signed petition for Briggs vs. Elliott (it’s the 5th of 6 images OR you can find it here from the previous link by scrolling down the page)

References for Briggs v. Elliott and Brown v. Board:

Brinson, Claudia Smith. "The Fires of Change That Would Sweep through the Nation's Schools Flarred in Rural Clarendon County in the late 1940s and '50s." The State (May 15, 1994), D1, 6.

Fogg, Tanya R. ""Slow to Change." The State (May 15, 1994), A1, 10.

Hornsby, Jr. Benjamin F. Stepping Stone to the Supreme Court: Clarendon County. Columbia, S.C.: S.C. Department of Archives and History, 1992.

Kluger, Richard. Simple Justice: The History of Brown v. Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Equality. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1976.

"The State Paid Dearly for Segregation" In "A Retrospective Look at South Carolina: 1941-1966," The State (March 3, 1991), 26.

Robinson, Bill, "Civil rights pioneer Eliza Briggs Dies at 81." The State (September 17, 1998), A1, 18.

Investing in Innovation (i3) Grant (should this be a picture--maybe of the SC map infographic--with a short description and then link off to another page like where we pulled the text?)

The Riley Institute at Furman, New Tech Network, and KnowledgeWorks won a highly competitive Investing in Innovation (i3) grant in 2011 for the development of STEM-focused New Tech schools in two of the nation’s persistently lowest-achieving, most economically under-resourced and underdeveloped rural communities in the nation.

The approximately $3 million grant provided the two project districts--Clarendon School District One and Colleton County School District--with:

  • five years of professional development and coaching by New Tech Network (approximately 600 hours),

  • New Tech Network’s integrated online learning platform (Echo),

  • some technology infrastructure, and

  • staff support from the New Tech Network and the Riley Institute.

Students will be prepared for college and career, graduating with the academic and employability skills we know our colleges and businesses demand, including: written and oral communication, critical thinking, collaboration, agency, and content knowledge. This one-time federal investment makes possible a multi-level transformation that ensures long-term sustainability through systemic changes, ongoing resources, and stakeholder support.

In August of 2013, ninth-graders in two rural South Carolina towns became the first to experience the innovative New Tech Network approach in South Carolina, through the i3 grant.  The project, “Creating a Corridor of Innovation,” implements the New Tech model, which is based on four design pillars:

  • Culture that Empowers: School-wide culture of empowerment for students and adults

  • Teaching that Engages: Project and problem-based approach to instruction

  • Technology that Enables: Use of technology for collaboration, access to information, and self-directed learning

  • Outcomes that Matter: Student outcomes for college, career, and civic life readiness

As of the 2016-17 school year, New Tech Network, which demonstrates strong evidence of improved academic and employability skills acquisition, supports nearly 200 elementary, middle, and high schools in 28 states and Australia. The model has been successful in a variety of settings -- urban, suburban and rural, including previously failing schools.

KnowledgeWorks and the Riley Institute believe that the New Tech Network approach is a key to transforming the so-called “Corridor of Shame” into a “Corridor of Innovation” and to transforming communities. The Riley Institute will continue to partner with New Tech to expand the Network throughout the Palmetto State as part of an intentional economic development strategy focused on preparing students for future challenges and opportunities.